My Documents

Here is a collection of miscellaneous documents which I have created but don't belong anywhere else on this website. These documents are sorted by date of publication with the most recent documents at the top.

The following file formats are used:

PDF icon PDF file
OpenOffice.org icon OpenOffice.org file
HTML icon HTML file
Maple icon Maple worksheet file

Drill bit diameters chart

2010-05-17

Download: PDF icon OpenOffice.org icon

Have you ever wanted to oversize a hole just by a little bit? Or want to find the closest fractional imperial size to a metric size? Having recently acquired alphanumeric and metric drill bits, I thought that this reference would be really useful. This colour coded chart lists the following drill bits by size in inches and mm:

  1. 1/16" to 1/2" by 1/64" increments
  2. 80 to 1 number drill bits
  3. A to Z letter drill bits
  4. 1mm to 13mm by 0.5mm increments

The great part about this is, if you have other sized bits, you can modify the spreadsheet yourself and make your own tables! Have fun!

Math and arithmetic warmup exercises

2009-04-18

Download: addition worksheet OpenOffice.org icon, subtraction worksheet OpenOffice.org icon, multiplication worksheet OpenOffice.org icon, division worksheet OpenOffice.org icon

I remember from grade 2 that we had these math exercises where we tried to do as many questions as possible in a 1 minute window. These exercises were called Mad Minutes. It was a lot of fun and it was great to see our arithmetic skills improve over time. I find that this exercise is great for a warm up prior to a math (or any other technical subject) class. These worksheets will generate 56 random questions everytime you load them. The idea is for the student to do as many as possible and beat their previous record. For lazy math instructors, the spreadsheet even generates an answer sheet with all the answers.

Euler's equation - relation between exponentials of complex numbers and sinusoids

2005-10-22

Download: PDF icon

During an ECE212 class, the professor mentioned that exp(j * β) = cos(β) + j * sin(β). Many people seemed to be mystified as to where this relation came from. Here is the proof.

This was taken from a math lecture. So replace all i's with j's and θ's with β's.

Replacement for the Vishay TSOP48xx IR reciever that comes with the FIRST robotics kit

2004-10-19

Download: PDF icon

Last year, the IR recievers given in our kits all broke, one after another. In an attempt to build an circuit that will act as a replacement for the part, this circuit was designed and built. It has comparable range to the original part and is a lot more robust as none of these circuits built have ever broke. To obtain reception only in the IR range, you can want to use high density floppy disk platters as optical filters.

Simple Drive Sysem

2004-01

Download: Maple icon PDF icon

This document shows the process of which a function is modeled to purdibate the speed of a robot for the FIRST competitions. This function provides the convenience of a single joystick drive while providing sensitive response in the slower speeds. While this was done in Maple, it can easily be adapted for any programming language.

The Invasion of the Bare Headed

2001-11

Download: HTML icon PDF icon

This was written in grade 10 as a creative writing assignment. Immediately, it caught the attentions of students and teachers. After the first draft was printed in computer engineering, a copy somehow ended up in Mr. Hussey’s mail box (hmmm...). Ever since, students have read this as an introduction to TOPS or for the pure enjoyment of it. I hope you enjoy it too.

Anyone care to write a study guide for this? Lecture notes? ;)


This page was last revised on 2010-05-17.

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